Research in to Practice: a plan for teaching self-regulation in English

Reflections from Reading I'm currently about half-way through reading John Hattie's Visible Learning for Teachers (Routledge, 2011). It's a comprehensive overview of 'what works' (and what doesn't) based on the evidence from the meta-analyses outlined in Visible Learning (Routledge, 2008). There are a couple of key take-aways from it, but I think the most important is about … Continue reading Research in to Practice: a plan for teaching self-regulation in English

Formative Assessment: Macbeth

In Daisy Christodoulou's Making Good Progress?, (click for SchoolsWeek review) she outlines different ways of using formative assessment in a meaningful way. Inspired by her book, I had a think about how I might apply a couple of the strategies she recommends: multiple choice tests, hyper-correction, and Question Level Analysis (QLA) to develop a formative assessment cycle … Continue reading Formative Assessment: Macbeth

Gender, Mental Health and Education: Further thoughts on Mark. Plan. Teach

  Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.comIn my previous post, reviewing McGill's excellent book, Mark. Plan. Teach., I said there was a section on mental health I took issue with. Throughout the book, McGill offers some excellent insights into the importance of recognising mental health and emotional wellbeing for both students and teachers, with advice from Natasha … Continue reading Gender, Mental Health and Education: Further thoughts on Mark. Plan. Teach

Mark. Plan. Teach by @TeacherToolkit (Ross Morrison McGill): A reflection

Disclaimer: I was selected in a Twitter competition to receive a free, signed copy of 'Mark. Plan. Teach.' I would have bought a copy of my own if I hadn't been. Having come quite late to the Edu-Twitter sphere, I had little knowledge of Ross Morrison McGill AKA @TeacherToolkit and his work until an overworked … Continue reading Mark. Plan. Teach by @TeacherToolkit (Ross Morrison McGill): A reflection

Practising what you Teach: Putting Evidence into Practice

A practical 'review' of What does this look like in the classroom (Hendrick and Macpherson, 2017). There is no greater evangelist than the recently converted. And honey, I am preaching. I don't want to structure this as a standard review of Carl Hendrick and Robin Macpherson's brilliantly edited collection of interviews with expert practitioners. You can … Continue reading Practising what you Teach: Putting Evidence into Practice